Czechs don’t… (American observations)

5 thoughts on “Czechs don’t… (American observations)”

  1. Nice. As a Czech person, I have few comments:
    1) Not introducing others is simply lack of manners. It’s something we are supposed to do, but some people forget it way too often.
    2) Not talking to strangers on the other hand is very much deliberate and I believe it to be a heritage of the Communist regime when talking to the wrong person could easily get you unpleasant talk with the secret police. To this day, we don’t talk to strangers and to a degree, we immediately suspect any stranger that approaches us.

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    1. I thought of the connection to Communism too, but do you think even young people have that suspicious feeling? I know it’s part of Czech heritage but they probably couldn’t identify it consciously – what do you think?

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      1. I think they just take it up from their parents. People may not consciously connect it to the previous regime, but they are doing consciously. It’s almost part of the etiquette. You don’t talk to strangers unless you have a reason. Saying “whats up, man” to a stranger on a street is almost seen (and sometimes used) as a form of aggression.

        It doesn’t help the matter that most people that do approach you in public in a big (big, haha, I know) city are:
        1) Insurance salesmen.
        2) People reeking of beer who just need X Kc for bus, where X happens to be the price of the cheapest bottled beer in the nearest watering hole.
        3) All kinds of charity drive people guilt tripping people who are just trying to get to work/school.

        So, mostly people who want your money.

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  2. Btw, I remembered another one super peculiar thing I’ve seen Americans do when I was in Oregon that Czechs never ever do. We never write on gifts (unless maybe we send them by mail) from whom they are. Even when you’re adult, christmas gifts come from Jezisek, end of discussion.

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    1. I KNOW!! haha! and when it’s not written, we’re very quick to say whom it’s from. we also like to write personal Christmas cards but the first year I was here, I was told that that’s very unusual.

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